The basics
Study abroad : Subject Guides

Why study Agriculture?

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Agriculture is no longer viewed simply as growing of crops or animal husbandry. In the modern world, this discipline touches on areas such as business, geography, sociology and conservation.

Studies in Agriculture focus on a combination of factors, from environmental challenges faced by farmers, to the pressure caused by overpopulation and food shortages that concern governments and global corporations.

With the global population expanding at an inexorable rate, today’s generation of agricultural students will combine fields of engineering, business and politics to find a solution.


Why study Agricultural Science?

Coming from a country like Nepal, a country rich in cultural diversity, climate, wildlife but still in the process of developing, I can say that such economies are a great place to start up a new business with new ideas that could revolutionise the agricultural sector.

There is still a gap in the agricultural market in developing nations and international students can study more on Agricultural science and become pioneers by introducing innovative ideas and by using relevant modern technologies that could increase production and the quality.


Entry requirements

The entry requirements depend upon the subjects you choose to study within the Agricultural courses. For most of the undergraduate courses it is usually anything equivalent to 3 A levels (in the UK) or the minimum qualifications for undergraduate in different study destinations.

If English is not your first language, an English test is compulsory. The university ranking also affects the entry requirement for the courses and therefore it is better to do some research as to which institution is better for you to undertake the course

See IELTS and TOEFL English exams.


Course Structure

The undergraduate course for Agricultural science related subjects typically lasts for 3 to 4 years. Some of the related subjects within this course include rural studies, species conservation, rural social science, resource management, landscape ecology, environmental studies and economics and management.

In the 1st year the modules basically cover geography, business management, economics, agriculture, wildlife, forestry, sociology, ecology and many more. The typical 2nd year modules include management of habitats for wildlife, human impact on environment, food farming,technology, uses of insecticides and pesticides and many more.

 In the 3rd year students start a research project that could be linked to a work placement. The modules also cover topics related to agricultural policy, strategic marketing, species conservation, resource management and various other issues.

For postgraduate courses in Agriculture, you can check the list of options available by following the link.

Agriculture and its related subjects is a vast field. It also includes the study on wildlife, how to sustain and get the most out of it through effective methods of production. It educates you not only in the use of insecticides/pesticides but also gives a basic knowledge of the business and the financial side of running an agricultural business.

In countries where the major source of revenue comes from land production, a degree-level understanding of the field is as valuable as the soil itself. As the ecologically rich lands of these nations move forward into modernity, the industry is set to boom.

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