The basics
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How to ace the MUET speaking paper


The MUET speaking test consists of three parts. In the first part, the examiner introduces himself and asks your name, address, interests and occupation. This lasts for 4-5 minutes and is fairly simple. Use this section to calm your nerves and practise your conversational English to get yourself comfortable.


In the second part, you’ll be given a sheet of paper with a topic written on it. You have to speak for 2 minutes on this topic. You are given 1 minute to write down your ideas on a sheet of paper provided. Make sure you read all the questions relating to the topic. You normally have to address two or three parts. Don’t miss out any question or you will end up losing marks. An easy way to do this is to mind map or to draw a spidergram. It’s quicker, it saves times and you can think better as your ideas develop.


Once you have finished your two minutes, the examiner will stop you and then ask you some questions on what you have talked about. The second part lasts a total of 3-4 minutes.


The third part involves a discussion between you and the examiner on a topic related to what you spoke about in part 2. You will be marked on fluency, vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and ideas. Avoid using bombastic words or words that you’re not familiar with. It’s alright to use simply words that are well structured grammatically.


Dos and Don’ts



  • List your ideas accordingly
  • Number your ideas as indicator
  • Maintain a natural conversation and eye contact



  • Write your ideas in paragraphs
  • Read word for  word from your paper


Delivery for Task A


Introduction – greet and introduce yourself. State the purpose of the presentation. Eg Good afternoon examiners. My name is Anne.


Body – General + Details. Eg Firstly… This is because… Example… (Do this for all points)


Conclusion – Restate the purpose and express your hope. Eg Finally, I would like to stress that euthanasia must not be legalised. It is hoped that by understanding the religious and legal implications,…


Using Sample Language Expressions  


Asking for and giving opinions


What do you think of…?


From my point of view


Interrupting and resuming expressing of opinions


Excuse me for interrupting, but…


As I was saying


Giving encouragement


Uh-huh, mm-hmm, yeah, right, yes


Expressing agreement/partial agreement/disagreement


I agree with you


That’s a good point, but…


No, I don’t think so.


Constructive disagreement


I completely understand your concern but I would disagree because…




To do well in your speaking test, start speaking English in everyday conversations. Avoid using your native language and cut out all the ‘lahs’. Watch English movies without the subtitles and read a lot of English books. Your dictionary should be your new best friend every time you encounter a new word.


If you're running out of time, find out how you can do some last minute preparations here.



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