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The 14 common myths and rumours surrounding IELTS!

Common myths and rumours about the IELTS examination that you believed to be facts!!

Doodle Nandi
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What are those rumours or myths surrounding IELTS that you believed or still believe to be true??

Quick highlights:

  1. I don’t need an IELTS coaching
  2. I should find an IELTS test centre in my city
  3. IELTS is difficult and tougher than other English exams 
  4. I should entertain the examiner 
  5. I need to focus on my accent and vocabulary 
  6. I should not express my opinions 
  7. I should keep practising only sample IELTS questions 
  8. I should cross my word limit 
  9. There is only one correct answer 
  10. Speaking is the most important module 
  11. If I pause more while speaking, I’ll fail to impress the examiner 
  12. I can easily cheat during the test 
  13. I should not worry about the time when writing the test 
  14. Certain IELTS test centres don't give high bands to certain candidates 

Sometimes, we easily fall prey to any second-hand information that we come across, but that doesn’t mean we’ll have to believe it or take it for granted. There are a group of people called ‘advisors’ in our offices in Chennai and Delhi who respond to all queries addressed by our students, providing some first-hand information to them and helping them with choosing a foreign destination for their career.

In this article, we talk about some rumours or myths surrounding IELTS that you believed or still believe to be true –

1. I don’t need an IELTS coaching –

You can prepare yourself for the IELTS. But it’s good to go for an IELTS coaching since there are things that you may be unable to understand on your own, especially the patterns of questions. You need to make sure you are aware of all the IELTS question patterns.

Check our online free IELTS practice test materials. 

2. I should find an IELTS test centre in my city –

None of the test centres in any cities are biased so wherever you sit for the test, you are not going to get any special attention or favour. The centres are concerned with treating each test-taker equally so don't think that you need to look for a test centre only in your city. 

Look for an IELTS test centre!

3. IELTS is difficult and tougher than other English exams –

That’s a wrong notion. IELTS is not difficult and there is no pass or fail concept in IELTS. You band score is determined on a scale of 9 and this practice is being followed for many years.

4. I should entertain the examiner –

No way! You are there just to write your exam and not entertain anyone. Similarly, the examiner is at the test centre to do his job, and not to watch Comedy Central! Just be modest and focus on your test.

5. I need to focus on my accent and vocabulary –

Why would you do that? Do you want the examiner to understand nothing? Speaking coherently is more important than speaking with an accent or flowery words.

6. I should not express my opinions –

So you come across a doubt, start chewing your pen and then slowly gulp down the doubt because you are too nervous to ask questions – is this you?! Better get rid of that behaviour and be an individualistic person. If you don’t clarify your doubts with the examiner, you might answer some questions wrongly and lose points.  

7. I should keep practising only sample IELTS questions –

Practising IELTS mock test materials will help – there is no doubt about it – but that's not enough. Remember to score good in IELTS you need to read English newspapers, good English journals, watch English series or movies, write in English every day, etc. Self-study is important besides what you learn from an IELTS test centre.

8. I should cross my word limit –

You should focus on the quality of your writing, not the quantity. Writing pages after pages may not impress the examiner much; instead you should focus on what you write and how you write it.

9. There is only one correct answer –

This is a long-lasting myth I guess! There is no specific answer to any questions in IELTS. Basically, the examiner judges the capability of a test-taker based on his/her grammar accuracy and range, pronunciation and the ability to grasp the questions, for example, two or more test-takers can choose different answers for a question and all could be correct because they imply similar meanings to the answer of a question.

10. Speaking is the most important module –

All the four modules are equally important in an IELTS test because at the end the average score matters. There are institutions abroad that stress not only on the average score but also on each module score. So you need to devote equal time for each module when writing an IELTS test.

11. If I pause more while speaking, I’ll fail to impress the examiner –

Again! You are wrong. You should be focusing on what you say and not on the clock ticking in your brain.

The examiner may not be counting the number of pauses that you give while speaking. Be yourself and speak clearly, and most importantly ‘you should not be thinking of the number of pauses that you give while speaking’; it could demotivate you.

12. I can easily cheat during the test –

wikiHow may teach you how to cheat during a test, but how far will you go in life with that attitude?

Every IELTS test centre follows certain guidelines, such as taking photographs and biometric to ensure the same person who registered is appearing for the test. Also, there are invigilators assigned at each centre to maintain decorum and security.

Identity checks are performed during each test and once you complete your test, your test material will be checked against your registration and seat details before releasing you from the centre.

None of the test centres entertain any sort of malpractice. In instances a student is caught cheating, that information is forwarded to the university where he/she has applied and to the visa processing office as well.

13. I should not worry about the time when writing the test –

Not only the quality of writing as mentioned in point 6 is important but also the time you spent in writing an IELTS. Make sure you complete all the four modules on time, but that doesn’t mean you will be hooked to your watch all the while. Time yourself by practising at home so that you develop your skills.

14. Certain IELTS test centres don't give high bands to certain candidates –

You may think that examiners at certain IELTS test centres are generous and somewhere else stricter to people from different nationalities. Well, that’s another rumour being circulated. As I said in point number 3, none of the test centres are biased because they are just doing their job on that day, and they don’t intent to favour or be rude to anyone due to any reasons.

IELTS is a high-profile exam, and both British Council and IDP test centres will never allow any malpractice during the test. It is up to you what you write based on which you are evaluated by the examiner.

Planning to take IELTS this year? You can register now. 

That’s all! You must have heard all the above 14 myths before, probably a few more that I haven’t mentioned here in this article. Now, all you can do is to keep your mind aside from these myths and rumours and focus on preparing for your IELTS.

And if you need any help regarding IELTS coaching, dial the toll free number 1800 103 2581 and speak to our study abroad experts so that they can fix your appointment with our IELTS expert. Good luck!

Image credit: Nursing Times.

Want to know more about the IELTS?

Nupur Verma Nupur Verma,
Study abroad expert.
We offer in-person and online IELTS training sessions at our office. Request a call from our advisors for more information on test-prep guidance. Or call 1800 103 2581 / 1800 103 9634 (toll-free) today!

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